Sphynx

Sphynx

This smart, high-energy breed loves to show off for his favourite people and is social to houseguests. The Sphynx seems to operate on two speeds: fast and stop. When it is time to nap, a Sphynx turns into a heat-seeking missile to find a toasty place, usually under the covers.

Although hairless cats have been reported throughout history, breeders in Europe have been working on the Sphynx breed since the early 1960s. Like so many other feline breeds, the present day Sphynx line has been a creation of the simultaneous work performed by nature and many committed, competent individuals.

The texture of Sphynx skin has been compared to a suede hot water bottle or warm chamois, and some cats almost have a buttery feel to the skin. One of the most frequent questions is, “Don’t they get cold?” If it is too cold for you, then it will probably be too cold for a hairless cat. However, these cats are smart enough to find a warm spot in the house, curled up with a dog or cat or warm human, or they will be snuggled under your bed covers.

Sphynx have sturdy boning, good muscle development and a bit of a firm belly as if they just finished a nice dinner. They have an open-eyed and intelligent expression with extra wrinkling
on their head which some see as a worried or inquisitive look. Sphynx are extremely lovable, known to perform silly antics and can be downright clumsy in their attempts to be the centre of attention.
They have abundant energy and are mischievous, always wanting to be with you, on you, or showing off for you. Sphynx seem to prefer human attention but enjoy the company of dogs and all other breeds of cats.

Though they lack a coat to shed or groom, they are not maintenance free. Body oils, which would normally be absorbed by the hair, tend to build up on the skin. As a result, regular bathing is usually necessary on a weekly or bi-weekly basis. Care should be taken to limit their exposure to outdoor sunlight, as they can develop sunburn.

While they lack much of the fur of other cat breeds Sphynx cats are not necessarily hypoallergenic. Allergies to cats are triggered by a protein called Fel d1, not cat hair itself. Fel d1 is a tiny and sticky protein primarily found in cat saliva and sebaceous glands. Those with cat allergies may react worse to direct contact with Sphynx cats than other breeds. However, conflicting reports of some people successfully tolerating Sphynx cats also exist. These positive reports may be cases of desensitizing, wherein the “hairless” cat gave the owner optimism to try to own a cat, eventually leading to the positive situation of their own adaptation.

Sphynx lovers consider them to be exceedingly rare and unusual, and because of this most breeders have waiting lists for their kittens. But, once you have had a Sphynx throw their arms around your neck and give your face loving wet kisses, you too will be hooked on this wonderful breed.