Welsh Corgi

Welsh Corgi

Adored by the Queen of England, Pembroke Welsh Corgis’ ancestry dates back to at least
the tenth century. A true dwarf breed, they are recognized by their foxy face and sturdy build.

The Welsh corgi is a small type of herding dog that originated in Wales. Two distinct breeds are recognized: the Pembroke Welsh corgi and the Cardigan Welsh corgi, with the Pembroke being the more common.

p06 Pembroke-Welsh-Corgi-1600x1200-desktopia.netPembrokes feature pointed ears, and are somewhat smaller in stature than the Cardigan. Considered a practical dog, they are low-set, intelligent, strong and sturdy with stamina sufficient to work a day on the farm. The dog’s head is fox-like and the tail short, which can be accomplished through breeding.

As herding dogs Corgi’s perform their duties by nipping at the heels; the dog’s low stature allows it to avoid being kicked in the process. As herding dogs, corgis work livestock differently than other breeds. Instead of gathering the cattle by running around the livestock, corgis drive the herd forward by nipping at their heels and working them from behind
in semicircles. Seldom giving ground, if an animal should turn and charge, the corgi will bite its nose, causing it to turn and re-join the herd. Although they specialize in herding cattle, corgis are also used to herd sheep and Welsh ponies. They are also one of the few breeds able to herd geese.

Pembroke Welsh Corgis are very affectionate, love to be involved in the family, and tend to follow wherever their owners go. They have a great desire to please their owners and are highly intelligent, thus making them eager to learn and train. Besides herding, they also function as watchdogs due to their alertness and tendency to bark only as needed. Most Pembrokes will seek the attention of everyone they meet and behave well around children and other pets. It is important to socialise this breed with other animals, adults and children when they are very young to avoid any anti-social behavior or aggression later in life. Due to their herding instinct, they love to chase anything that moves, so it is best to keep them inside fenced areas.

Naturally active little dogs, they should always be encouraged to remain so. They need to be taken on a long daily walk. Corgis can have a tendency to gain weight easily if their lives are too sedentary. As a dog with a relatively long back, if they are allowed to gain excess weight this can lead to issues and health problems with their backs and joints. While out on the walk the dog must be made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as in a dog’s mind the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be human.